Trained Parrot BlogParrot Wizard Online Parrot Toy StoreThe Parrot Forum

Parahawking

Discuss topics associated with teaching birds to fly. Training parrots recall flight, target flying, and other flying exercises.

Parahawking

Postby Darko » Fri Jan 05, 2018 6:55 pm

Hi everyone! Is it possible to teach bigger species of parrots this? I posted the link down below. I have lovebirds but I don't think that they are capable of doing this. But maybe larger species of parrots would be able to do it. I am Paragliding pilot and I would love to teach Eclectus or macaw to do this

https://m.youtube.com/watch?v=aDG9jXvXhyQ
Darko
Lovebird
 
Gender: This parrot forum member is male
Posts: 26
Location: Belgrade
Number of Birds Owned: 2
Types of Birds Owned: peach faced lovebird
Flight: Yes

Re: Parahawking

Postby Michael » Fri Jan 05, 2018 6:59 pm

I've never heard of this being done with parrots ever. The closest thing I've seen is a car or motorcycle. However, hawks fly differently than parrots so it is quit different.
User avatar
Michael
Macaw
 
Gender: This parrot forum member is male
Posts: 6149
Location: New York
Number of Birds Owned: 3
Types of Birds Owned: Senegal Parrot, Cape Parrot, Green-Winged Macaw
Flight: Yes

Re: Parahawking

Postby Darko » Fri Jan 05, 2018 7:16 pm

Hi Michael. My lovebirds follow me regularly while I ride my bicycle, but Paragliding is slow and macaw have powerful and broad wings, plus parrots have ability to form a much stronger bond with humans than hawks are capable off (Plus parrots are much smarter than the hawks are) I'm considering trying this. Probably I will buy Eclectus or macaw and will fly with him while he is still a baby so he get a just to a Paragliding, flying, altitude and the mountain environment. I think that is natural for parrots to fly next to the partner.
Darko
Lovebird
 
Gender: This parrot forum member is male
Posts: 26
Location: Belgrade
Number of Birds Owned: 2
Types of Birds Owned: peach faced lovebird
Flight: Yes

Re: Parahawking

Postby Pajarita » Sat Jan 06, 2018 1:01 pm

Well, for one thing, the birds on the video are not hawks, they are vultures [I guess 'paravulturing' doesn't sound as good as 'parahawking' :lol: ]. Second, birds of prey can fly for hours and hours and hours without getting tired because the shape of their wings allow them to glide on high currents without a whole lot of effort on their part - parrots wings are different and they hardly ever fly for very long. Third, birds of prey were created to fly at very high altitudes [the record is held by a vulture, as a matter of fact]-parrots are not [even macaws fly barely above the canopy and ekkies not even that high]. Fourth, they bond as deeply as parrots would because they also mate for life.

We often extrapolate information from one species and use it as a base for another but it's one thing when you are doing this in terms of physiological functions and a completely different thing when you are talking about physical characteristics needed for survival that took hundreds of thousands of years to fine-tune. Basically, what I am trying to say is that flight is not the same for all flighted birds and this is why there are all different shapes of wings, different feet, different degrees of vision accuracy, etc. You really cannot compare an Egyptian vulture to a, say, Solomon Island eclectus or a blue and gold macaw - it's like saying that because an Arabian horse can run fast, a cow should be able to do it, too.
Pajarita
Norwegian Blue
 
Gender: This parrot forum member is female
Posts: 13296
Location: NE New Jersey
Number of Birds Owned: 30
Types of Birds Owned: Toos, grays, zons, canaries, finches, cardinals, senegals, jardine, redbelly, sun conure, button quail, GCC, PFC, lovebirds
Flight: Yes

Re: Parahawking

Postby Darko » Sat Jan 06, 2018 2:06 pm

Yes paravulturing doesn't sound appealing: -) Probably they use vultures because hawk will fly away to hunt, if some birds fly near by. I don't have to fly to high and planning to teach my parrot to rest on my shoulder if he gets tired. I found this video (if macaw can keep up with a fast boat, Paragliding want to be a problem at all)

https://m.youtube.com/watch?v=vrV3zw5zEbo
Darko
Lovebird
 
Gender: This parrot forum member is male
Posts: 26
Location: Belgrade
Number of Birds Owned: 2
Types of Birds Owned: peach faced lovebird
Flight: Yes

Re: Parahawking

Postby Pajarita » Sun Jan 07, 2018 12:40 pm

Hmmm - the first video of this bird free-flying was four years ago [2014], I assume taken when he was old enough to fly at about nine months of age - then there were videos on 2015 and 2016 but not a single one in 2017 - why? Most likely because the bird flew away and they never found him again. Macaws don't reach their sexual maturity until they are four years old so the dates match perfectly: baby bird flies to follow 'mother', adult bird flies away.

People think that parrots are feathered dogs and that, because they get them as babies and the training works, that this is what they are going to get for the rest of their lives. But only people who don't know enough about parrots thinks this because they are not taking into consideration that parrots belong to undomesticated species and that obedience is not part of their psychological make-up. Basically, what I am trying to say is that training does not work in the long term with them because, once they want to breed, they will leave you quicker than you can say Jiminy Cricket. Not my opinion but a fact of nature and the reason why Michael recommends flying your bird only with a harness - but, of course, you can't be paragliding with a harnessed parrot! It would end up getting hurt or killed.
Pajarita
Norwegian Blue
 
Gender: This parrot forum member is female
Posts: 13296
Location: NE New Jersey
Number of Birds Owned: 30
Types of Birds Owned: Toos, grays, zons, canaries, finches, cardinals, senegals, jardine, redbelly, sun conure, button quail, GCC, PFC, lovebirds
Flight: Yes

Re: Parahawking

Postby Darko » Sun Jan 07, 2018 7:31 pm

He still has his parrot and his macaw was born 2001. I just contacted him. Soon he will post new videos. There is a partner bond as well and macaw can see their owner as a lifelong partner. Not to mention that hand raised birds are deeply imprinted on to humans and some of them are unable to pair up with their own species any more. This is what he said; Well Vito was born 2001, sometimes flies with me to town, 4 km away. He likes to flap his wings on my head or take advantage of the vehicle's stream...
Darko
Lovebird
 
Gender: This parrot forum member is male
Posts: 26
Location: Belgrade
Number of Birds Owned: 2
Types of Birds Owned: peach faced lovebird
Flight: Yes

Re: Parahawking

Postby Pajarita » Wed Jan 10, 2018 11:08 am

If there is one thing I have learned from postings on the net is that 99.99 percent of people lie on them... Yes, baby parrots born in captivity imprint to humans because we trick them into it but baby parrots born in the wild imprint to their parents and they still leave them for a mate. And a well-adjusted, healthy parrot will not consider the human its mate. This is something that has to be avoided at all costs -sometimes it cannot be done but it should not be from lack of trying.

Look, you seem determined to get a parrot just so you can free-fly it and I cannot tell you what to do or what not to do. Unfortunately for parrots, under the law, they are property, just like a table or a chair so the owner can do whatever he/she wants with it -even kill it for no good reason as long as it's done humanely. What I can tell you is what I would or would not do with mine - and I would NEVER risk losing or hurting one. There is no benefit for a parrot to be free-flown. None - zero - zilch. The extra large species can be exercised just as well with a harness so risking the bird getting hurt, lost or even killed doing something that is not necessary makes no sense to me. But that's me...
Pajarita
Norwegian Blue
 
Gender: This parrot forum member is female
Posts: 13296
Location: NE New Jersey
Number of Birds Owned: 30
Types of Birds Owned: Toos, grays, zons, canaries, finches, cardinals, senegals, jardine, redbelly, sun conure, button quail, GCC, PFC, lovebirds
Flight: Yes

Re: Parahawking

Postby Navre » Wed Jan 10, 2018 12:57 pm

And as I read this I am again looking at the (pretty gross) remains of a pigeon eaten under my feeder by a hawk. It's probably the male sharp shinned hawk that has been around. This is in a back yard, in a busy city, with lots of people around, and barking dogs in the three adjoining yards.

Parrots are prey animals. Captive parrots are also unwise, and not savvy to wild things like hawks and falcons. Actual wild birds get picked off all the time. Our relatively unwise, brightly colored, non native birds are sitting ducks (actually sitting ducks get away from snowy owls all the time).

If you're going to do this, get the biggest bird you can. Greenwing or Hyacinth. They might be ignored by the smaller raptors.
Navre
African Grey
 
Gender: This parrot forum member is male
Posts: 1740
Number of Birds Owned: 3
Types of Birds Owned: Turquoise Green Cheek Conure
Timneh African Grey
Hooded Parrot
Flight: Yes


Return to Recall Flight & Flighted Tricks

Who is online

Users browsing this forum: No registered users and 1 guest

Parrot ForumArticles IndexTraining Step UpParrot Training BlogPoicephalus Parrot InformationParrot Wizard Store