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Where do you put your Parrot when it's out of the Cage?

Chat about general parrot care and parrot owner lifestyle. Bird psychology, activities, trimming, clipping, breeding etc.

Re: Where do you put your Parrot when it's out of the Cage?

Postby PatrickAlan » Sat Apr 22, 2017 7:43 am

alienlady wrote:Patrick I obviously misread the situation, I do apologise.


To be honest, I just can't go thru my busy days with a Parrot on my shoulder. Perhaps there are those bird owners out there who can. For me, it's just not practical. I do take 'JoJo' out of her cage numerous times during the day to hold her, cuddle and put her on my shoulder, while I'm working on my computer. Sometimes she behaves, and sometimes she just doesn't. I have the "Percher" for her - but she refuses to stay on it and flies off, and usually ends up on the floor. I do use the word "No" with her or "No Bite". This is clearly a work in progress, but she is only 4-months old, and she truly is a joy to have around, she's very sweet and clearly does love my company. I'm enjoying her immensely.
PatrickAlan
Parrotlet
 
Gender: This parrot forum member is male
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Re: Where do you put your Parrot when it's out of the Cage?

Postby Michael » Sat Apr 22, 2017 10:21 am

That is totally fine. You shouldn't put or let your parrot on your shoulder unless you are completely comfortable with it being there and your ability to remove it.
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Michael
Macaw
 
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Re: Where do you put your Parrot when it's out of the Cage?

Postby Pajarita » Sat Apr 22, 2017 1:09 pm

But does she really bite you or is she beaking you? Because a bite implies aggression, blood letting, etc. while beaking is what they do when they are young and learning textures and flavors. It's kind of like when babies put everything in their mouth or puppies chew on EVERYTHING -I raised a bull mastiff mix for one of my daughters that chew the sheetrock on the walls! :shock: (he is the most perfect dog now). It's just experimentation and they outgrow it but you do need to teach them where your pain threshold is so, when they start applying too much pressure with the beak, what I do is touch (kind of like a very gentle tap) the top of their heads and say: "Gently, gently" and praise, praise, praise when they release it.

As to some owners being able to do chores with birds on their shoulders, that's me! :lol: I do almost all my morning chores with a couple of birds on me and can do practically anything with them along... wash dishes and floors, sweep, dust, clean cages, feed the dogs, clean litter boxes, take a shower (not on me but on the towel rod with the shower curtain opened just a crack so they can see me), etc. I've gotten so used to it that I hardly notice and they have gotten so used to it that they move up and down my back, my front or my arms following my movements without any of us even realizing what we are doing. I am a human bird perch! :lol:
Pajarita
Norwegian Blue
 
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