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Tennessee USA sun coure help!

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Re: Tennessee USA sun coure help!

Postby Swanson34 » Sat Dec 24, 2016 9:29 am

Do they need seeds and pellets or can she just be on strict fruits and veggie for awhile?
Swanson34
Parrotlet
 
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Re: Tennessee USA sun coure help!

Postby Swanson34 » Sat Dec 24, 2016 9:59 am

I'm kindve clueless as to get her to stop regurgitating food for me. It's a non stop battle. The humping isn't any better either. I'm confused as to why she thinks SHE HAS to do this.
Swanson34
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Re: Tennessee USA sun coure help!

Postby Rmoses » Sat Dec 24, 2016 11:04 am

Swanson34 wrote:I'm kindve clueless as to get her to stop regurgitating food for me. It's a non stop battle. The humping isn't any better either. I'm confused as to why she thinks SHE HAS to do this.

All the clues are in the posts above. Diet, Solar sleeping times, and cuddling. This bird wants to have sex with you because the hormones are high due to diet and solar schedule, and then you cuddle and if you touch anywhere except the head, neck and feet then you are telling the bird that you want to have sex with it. You have only been on this forum for a few days so it is going to take some time to change the diet, get it on a solar schedule and see a difference. You want the bird to change, but you have to change also. So, take a breath, make the changes that are needed and wait for the bird to respond. Stay with the forum, there are many people here that can and want to help you and your bird. Thanks for joining us, it's always good to know of other people that love theirs birds.
Rick
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Re: Tennessee USA sun coure help!

Postby Pajarita » Sun Dec 25, 2016 11:39 am

Swanson34 wrote:I'm kindve clueless as to get her to stop regurgitating food for me. It's a non stop battle. The humping isn't any better either. I'm confused as to why she thinks SHE HAS to do this.


OK, let's see if we can clarify this a bit for you. She doesn't 'think' she 'has' to do this, she has no choice about it and I'll explain why. Altricial (this means that the animal is born helpless and needs its parents to take care of it - parrots are highly altricial) birds have a time 'window' when they imprint both filially (love for its parents) and sexually (when they learn what the 'spouse' needs to look like). In the wild, because it's always the parents that take care of it, the babies imprint to their own species BUT because we steal the babies from their parents and handfeed them, pet parrots imprint to humans. This creates all kinds of problems for them because some of them end up been really confused as to what species they should have sex with -yours think that she should have sex with humans and that's why she regurgitates for you.

A normal bird (one that has been following a solar light schedule) will only get hormonal during breeding season but, although they all get the 'itch' during this time, it's not something that completely overwhelms them because before things get really bad, the season ends and they stop making sexual hormones, making the urge disappear. BUT, when you keep a bird under a human light schedule and feed it too much protein (rich and abundant food is another trigger for reproduction as animals can only raise their babies when there is more than enough of it to go around), the bird's body goes out of whack because it produces sexual hormones non-stop which creates a completely overwhelming sexual arousal with no relief (it also causes them acute physical discomfort and even pain as their sexual organs continue to grow past the point that nature meant) and that is why yours masturbates with you.

Now, putting her to a strict solar schedule and reducing protein will, in time, bring her endocrine system back on track and in tune with the seasons so, when the breeding season ends, she will stop producing sexual hormones and her gonads will shrink and become dormant which, in turn, will make the 'itch' disappear. The thing is that it takes time for this to happen because nothing happens overnight and the longer an endocrine system has been out of whack, the longer it will take to go back on track (I once had a female lovebird that had been used as a breeder for 9 years take four entire seasons for this to happen). And there is nothing you can do to either 'convince' or 'teach' her not to do this or speed up the process. As a matter of fact, if this was my bird, I would not scold her or even try to dissuade her from doing these things that do, in a way, make her fell a little better in her time of need. We have just gone through the winter solstice which marked the longest night and the shortest day of the year and the days will be getting longer and longer - this is not going to help your bird because, in essence, this time of the year, the birds bodies 'notice' the difference in daylight hours increase and will start to 'prepare' for the breeding season (I will post something about that in the Health section) so your bird will take longer now than it would have taken if her schedule and diet had been changed, say, during the summer months. But don't let this deter you in any way because the sooner you start, the sooner she will feel better.

As to your question of whether she could eat just produce for now... Well, yes, she could (for a short time, mind you!) BUT she is not going to feel full and satisfied so, if I were you, I would switch her to the diet that is going to work out for her for the duration because you will have to do it sooner or later and, in my personal opinion, it's always better to do these things sooner when the bird is so hormonal.

Parrots are very difficult pets to keep healthy and happy. Everything is hard... you need to learn so much about so many difficult subjects (anatomy, physiology, pathogens, treatments, ewtand keep in mind so many things that the often brandished 'low maintenance' that petstores and breeders use to describe them is absolutely risible for anybody who has had one for years. Everything takes A LOT of work: feeding, cleaning, spending time with them, etc. And everything is super protracted with them: getting them on a good diet, bonding, training, etc. so getting impatient is something we all understand because we all went through it. And we all get exasperated, too, so don't feel bad about it, it's a common 'ailment' among parrot keepers :lol: The thing is that we are all used to keeping animals that have been domesticated for thousands of years as companions to humans and for which we can buy great food already prepared; they are mammals like us and they all belong to hierarchical societies of one sort or another so we can easily identify with them as well as their problems and behaviors but parrots are on a level reserved just to themselves as pets and, regardless of how much experience we had with other species, we all have to go back to the drawing board and start from scratch so, like Rick said, take a deep breath and don't get all bent out of shape by this problem. It's solvable - you just have to re-evaluate things, make a plan and stick to it.
Pajarita
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Re: Tennessee USA sun coure help!

Postby Wolf » Tue Dec 27, 2016 7:33 am

Although the actual circumstances are different than yours, I would like to share with you one example of what Pajarita is trying to convey about learning about your bird so that you can work with the bird to resolve its issues and the amount of time, patience and understanding that it takes to help them.

I have a female Yellow-Naped Amazon who was raised by the same family for 14 years before she came to me to live. When Mimi came here the first three days were spent screaming non stop except for when she slept, and during these first few days she did not stop even to eat. After the third day of this she started to eat and responded with something that she had never before known to have said " Good food".

One phrase and then she went right back to screaming for the next three months, stopping only to sleep and eat. In fact the only easy thing for her to accomplish was eating her foods, she loves her food. She could not be touched, would not come out of her cage or interact with us in any way. It took her 3 months to stop screaming all of the time, It took nearly a year for her screaming to stop most of the time unless she became excited or scared and then the screaming was back in full force. By the way the only parrot speech that she knows is screaming and all of the rest is human speech.

To make this short and sweet it has taken nearly 5 years for Mimi to become a bird for the first time in her life and I am blessed and amazed that she has made so much progress in so short of a time. She now comes out of her cage by herself, she talks to us most of the time and even sings now and then, it sounds a lot like opera singing. She climbs around on her cage, on her boing rope hanging from the ceiling as well as on a tree that I built for her. These are all major improvements but the most important ones are that she now actively seeks out the chance to interact with us, she takes nuts as treats, she wants to be touched and have her head scratched, she loves being able to touch us even though she still nips us sometimes. She would not or could not do any of these things at first. She has now begun to explore other birds cages, mostly when they are out and about and starting to go down to the floor to walk about and explore the room that she lives in. It has been a long time and a difficult one for her to realize that it was alright for her to be herself as well as to begin to learn from the other birds to be a bird. She is totally amazing, but it does take patience and understanding and a lot of learning about your bird and its needs. It takes a lot of time, but it is well worth all of the time and patience and the learning.
Wolf
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Re: Tennessee USA sun coure help!

Postby Bird woman » Tue Dec 27, 2016 8:39 am

Takes a saint to have the patients to make a difference in a birds life when they never were left to be a bird in the beginning. Cudos to you wolf :thumbsup:
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Re: Tennessee USA sun coure help!

Postby Swanson34 » Tue Dec 27, 2016 7:08 pm

Small adjustments made, she goes to bed at 8 gets up at 9 I leave the tv on for her in the living room until 11:30 for my lunch then it's her nap time until 3:30/4 when I get home. From there it's time to feed everyone dinner and make sure the cages aren't a mess, i decided to give her only fruit tonight for dinner and she refused to touch any of it, banana, black berry,Avocado, and kiwi instead of her seed, she then preceded to pick the fruit up and throw it at me saying "I hate you" I purchased some new food for her called Kaytee fiesta variety mix which has a lot of good fruits and veggies plus high protein stuff should be in tomorrow or then next day. How should I go about her refusing to eat her fruit
Swanson34
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Re: Tennessee USA sun coure help!

Postby Bird woman » Tue Dec 27, 2016 7:39 pm

Get that avocado out of that birds cage now!!!!!! Poison you really need to start reading on your bird. BW
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Re: Tennessee USA sun coure help!

Postby Loriusgarrulus » Wed Dec 28, 2016 12:56 am

Thank goodness she is not eating friut yet. Advocado is very toxic to parrot. I heard of someone who went on holiday and her daughter came round to stay and look after her parrots.
The supermarket had advocados on special offer and the daughter in her ignorance bought then a load as she thought they would be a special treat.
The vet managed to save one amazon who wasn't big on eating fruit. The 3 macaws died.
Growing Old Disgracefully
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Re: Tennessee USA sun coure help!

Postby Wolf » Wed Dec 28, 2016 9:46 am

PLease go to the health and nutrition section of the forum, look on the third page for the topic labeled poisonous and safe fruits and vegetables, then look on the second page to find the beginning of the list. THis list continues information on safe Ndola dangerous foods, as well as toxic and safe plants and woods and household items that you will find extremely valuable to both yourself and your parrot.

PLeas forgive the alarmed responses that you receive in regards to the avocado , but you must understand that Avacado is poisonous to parrots and people were shocked. I wold have posted the link that I told you how to find but I am not using my own laptop I am using an I pad at the local hospital.

I hope that you find this response to be helpful for both yout bird and yourself.
Wolf
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