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Re: Hello Parrot Forum.

Postby Pajarita » Sun Mar 26, 2017 10:24 am

Re: honeymoon period. I think that the length of this period depends entirely on the species of bird, the care it got in the past, how long it was and the care it's receiving in the new house. If the bird is of an 'easy' species (the kind that bonds easily and deep with people), it's relatively healthy, was not severely neglected or abused at his previous home and the new home provides good care all around (good diet, good light quality and schedule, a steady daily routine and experienced handling), the honeymoon period is short BUT if the poor bird starts from minus zero (health, socialization, previous inadequate care, etc), it's of a 'difficult' species (like an IRN, for example), and the new owner is inexperienced and expects (and demands) too much, too soon of the bird, it will take much longer.

But, aside from this, I also think that there are two different periods at work when we rehome an adult animal. One is the honeymoon period and the other is the 'finding its place in the flock' period. The honeymoon period is the one where, as it was stated above by previous posters, the bird behaves so as not to call attention to itself until it feels relatively comfortable in its new surroundings, the other one is the one it needs in order to feel 100%, completely at ease with EVERYTHING - and part of this is the actual running of a couple of complete cycle of seasons. It seems to me that a bird needs to go through a couple of the four seasons in order for the new owner to be able to say: "OK, this is, pretty much, what it is" This doesn't mean that the bird will not change at all for the rest of its life, mind you! But it's the point when one can 'see' the actual personality of the bird.
Pajarita
Norwegian Blue
 
Gender: This parrot forum member is female
Posts: 11300
Location: NE New Jersey
Number of Birds Owned: 30
Types of Birds Owned: Toos, grays, zons, canaries, finches, cardinals, senegals, jardine, redbelly, sun conure, button quail, GCC, PFC, lovebirds
Flight: Yes

Re: Hello Parrot Forum.

Postby Chad » Sun Mar 26, 2017 1:08 pm

I'm excited at the potential in helping change of birds life with this opportunity. While I don't have any hands-on experience, i have sent months and months now learning academically as much as I possibly can. I started by reading some old school training books, this morning I finished Michael's book (it makes so much more sense to me that a lot of these other books that really have such big gaps in training or simply forces the bird to obey.) I Take to tasks in a very analytical way. I already have a whole database worth of metrics outlined in my mind to track different metrics of the birds behavior and physical being. (I'm pretty nerdy).

Being a foster provider I feel bad that the bird ultimately will bond to me but luckily I have some animal loving family members and friends, who can help with socializing. I know at this moment I'm not personally going in with the expectation of I am fostering this bird to adopt it. Who knows that might change but right off the bat I am going in with the expectation I am here to learn and help shape this animals life for the better.

I feel like this could be a really good learning experience especially with direct help from the rescue and with all of your great and caring knowledge from you guys on here.
Chad
Parakeet
 
Gender: This parrot forum member is male
Posts: 8
Number of Birds Owned: 0
Flight: Yes

Re: Hello Parrot Forum.

Postby stevesjk » Sun Mar 26, 2017 3:10 pm

Reading about caring for a parrot is a lot different to when you got an actual parrot in your care because the literature on these birds is so general and they really are very individual creatures, i realised this not long after my parrot was dangling from my nose trying to tear me a third nostril.

Youre doing the right thing fostering because you can give it back if its not for you. Id go in with the mindset of you're definitely giving it back after a set amount of time so anything else is a bonus.

I wouldnt be surprised if you end up adopting the first one you receive because being a new fosterer i doubt very much they'll give you a complicated case to start you off.
stevesjk
Conure
 
Gender: This parrot forum member is male
Posts: 121
Number of Birds Owned: 2
Types of Birds Owned: Senegal parrot budgie
Flight: Yes

Re: Hello Parrot Forum.

Postby Pajarita » Mon Mar 27, 2017 11:52 am

Yes, Steve is correct. And I would add that being a foster parent is one of the noblest and hardest things an animal lover has to do because you inevitably become attached to the animal and the animal to you so giving it up is, pretty much, like giving up your own child. I don't know a single foster parent that did not 'fail' with one or more... I, myself, ended up adopting a number of my fosters -some because they did not seem to work out anywhere else and some because I couldn't resist them :D
Pajarita
Norwegian Blue
 
Gender: This parrot forum member is female
Posts: 11300
Location: NE New Jersey
Number of Birds Owned: 30
Types of Birds Owned: Toos, grays, zons, canaries, finches, cardinals, senegals, jardine, redbelly, sun conure, button quail, GCC, PFC, lovebirds
Flight: Yes

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