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Finding a good home

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Re: Finding a good home

Postby Bird woman » Fri May 26, 2017 5:46 am

Just checking in girls. :D a lot going on 6 rescues came in and 3 requiring medical and close supervision. Remember when I said the jury is still out when I was going to team up with that rescue , well the jury has come in with a guilty verdict judging by the condition of these birds. A lot to do and not enough hours in the day but what is really cool is that umbrella with the chronic prolapse is making huge progress and I found a vet about 5 hours away to preform the extensive surgery on him. He's not picking anymore and coming out of that hormonal neediness but what a hand full. He's into everything and just a pure delight. He was suppose to be a biter but as of yet he hasn't. :shock: He's pretty busy boy which is good and his blood work came out great. Now to fix all the broken babies that just got here 2 days ago. BW.
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Bird woman
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Re: Finding a good home

Postby Pajarita » Fri May 26, 2017 9:32 am

I'm sure it's me being dense but I am not sure if I understand what you posted... The rescue that you were thinking of becoming a 'satellite center' of sent you birds that were in terrible shape so you are not going to work with them? Is that it? If so, you need to get your own 501(c)3 and pronto, Patti!
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Gender: This parrot forum member is female
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Location: NE New Jersey
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Flight: Yes

Re: Finding a good home

Postby Bird woman » Fri May 26, 2017 7:52 pm

Already in the works! It's not about the condition they were surrendered in , it's the condition they were kept in and had become in ,after making people pay hundreds of dollars to surrender them and signing paperwork saying they being the previous owner will be responsible for first year of nessesary medical. And no pajirta, you should know me by now I couldn't turn any animal away that needed me. I've already found a group that thinks more in line with my feelings about the needs of the birds first. We are working out the details now. I realize that there are a lot of good intentioned people out there but the bottom line is the bottom line and if money isn't used smartly and things aren't taken care of right , then the birds suffer and I'm just not good with that and it sure as hell isnt okay. {EVER} I have been doing so much research lately and im pretty shocked at what I'm finding out , really I don't know what to think anymore . :( BW
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Gender: This parrot forum member is female
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Location: Southern , Oregon
Number of Birds Owned: 10
Types of Birds Owned: 2 mollucans, 2 LSC'S, 2 macaws, 1 bare-eye, 1 grey, 1 goffin and max the quaker
Flight: Yes

Re: Finding a good home

Postby Pajarita » Sat May 27, 2017 1:14 pm

I hear you loud and clear! And, yes, that is the latest trend: rescues ask for money or they won't take your bird. It started a number of years ago because, when I was looking for rescues to take in the birds I had in mine, they were already doing it (and in the thousands of dollars for each bird, too!).

The sad truth is that not all rescues are created equal... There are some that are very good (they don't take more animals than what they can afford to keep well and are always and forever super broke), there are the ones that call themselves rescues and talk the talk but don't walk the walk (these are the ones that pretend to be rescues when, in reality, are nothing but flippers -I personally know of a couple of these- or collectors that want birds for free -as well as a couple of these, too) and then there are the greatest majority of them which try to make things work in terms of numbers by not being as good as they know they should be... The thing is that a lot of the birds that end up in rescue are birds that are in such terrible shape so as to render them unsellable (which, let's face it, it's what most people do in CL when they 'rehome' their birds) and super expensive to bring back so these rescues do the minimum necessary to get the bird up to an acceptable (if not good) level of health and hope that the person who adopts them will 'finish' them up on their own. It's not something that I can live with personally (and that's why I ended up losing my house in Pa) but I do understand why they do it because there are SOOOOOO many birds out there that, like it or not, if you want to rescue as many as you can, you have to end up cutting corners to make it work.

And this is why we need to change the laws and make the breeders register and produce only a certain number of birds a year! It's either that or start euthanizing left and right as we do with dogs and cats nowadays.

But, Patti, I think that, in your case, I would not work with any rescue but start my own because you are never going to be happy with other people deciding what to pay for or what not to pay for when it comes to medical care, or who to adopt to or not to adopt, etc. With your own, you decide, you fundraise, you choose who is going to get the bird, etc.
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Flight: Yes

Re: Finding a good home

Postby Bird woman » Sat May 27, 2017 9:32 pm

So glad you understand and obviously your getting to know me pretty well cause you hit it all right on the nail head! I'm so busy because 7 came in just 2 days apart. I am very through when I check the birds out and thank god they all wanted baths so I could see there whole little body's . The prolapse boy is changing rapidly and pearl the umbrella that looks and feels like a porcupine is changing in 4 days to. We will see how long it takes me before I crash and burn. It's so much better taking in one at a time. I have an update on terrible Nigel the LSC that was a male bonded bird that bites. He is scared of hot pink socks, my grand daughter left some over when she spent the night and left them on the bedroom floor which anything on the floor Nigel tears up and claims for his. Well he was going round and round the socks and stayed clear of them so I put them on and now he won't try to bite my feet anymore with those socks on. :mrgreen: who knew :roll: gotta get some more. I'll give a pretty through description of all the baby's at a later date. Going to rest now it's quiet and the babies are in BED. :thumbsup: BW
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Gender: This parrot forum member is female
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Types of Birds Owned: 2 mollucans, 2 LSC'S, 2 macaws, 1 bare-eye, 1 grey, 1 goffin and max the quaker
Flight: Yes

Re: Finding a good home

Postby stevesjk » Sun May 28, 2017 4:19 am

As rescuers do you feel that the majority of parrot health problems come from the stress of lack of companionship? I.e humans getting bored of them and confining them to rooms on their own.
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Re: Finding a good home

Postby Bird woman » Sun May 28, 2017 7:15 am

There are so many different reasons but my experience tells me that when our companion birds are not allowed to do the very basics such as flight , sunshine , foraging and climbing then a lot of health issues will and most likely occur. There's also the chemicals used around them messing up there respatory systems . Several that have come in this time are mostly mutilating due to I'm sure as you said the lack of companionship and banishment which is exactly what they got when they were put into the rescue. I get so mad when I think is this all that can be done when rescued , put in a cage , maybe given a healthier diet and some great toys and a spray bath every week??? This is not enough , they need companionship , freedom and lots of love. Pajirta is right on limiting or if I dare say stoping breeding altogether as we are doing a grave injustice to all these winged beauties. I hope most that rescue have the best of intentions but have found that a lot are just as pajirta had said in her post . I try to be so much different but can tell how very quickly things could get out of hand. My biggest challenge is the medical and getting them accepting of me quickly as there is flight , sunshine and trees and foraging on the lawn outside that awaits them. I do have a huge flight area right off the bird room but I have to be able to get them back in if they go out safely. Several of the birds in the morning after there breakfast wait on the window seal tapping on the window to let them fly out. I don't have a flight area off the quarantine room . BW
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Bird woman
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Gender: This parrot forum member is female
Posts: 839
Location: Southern , Oregon
Number of Birds Owned: 10
Types of Birds Owned: 2 mollucans, 2 LSC'S, 2 macaws, 1 bare-eye, 1 grey, 1 goffin and max the quaker
Flight: Yes

Re: Finding a good home

Postby Pajarita » Sun May 28, 2017 10:34 am

stevesjk wrote:As rescuers do you feel that the majority of parrot health problems come from the stress of lack of companionship? I.e humans getting bored of them and confining them to rooms on their own.


The problems that pet parrots have are all caused by captivity. Period. The truth is that these animals should not have been made into human pets for the simple reason that their physical and psychological needs cannot be met by anybody who has a normal lifestyle. It's not a matter of whether the owner loves them or not, it's that their needs are too complicated and there is no leeway to 'maneuver' around them! How many people do you know that can give them a flock, a strict solar schedule and good full spectrum light for the winter as well as an outdoor aviary for the summer and an organic fresh food diet, that allows them unrestricted flight and to breed naturally (and no, not even breeders allow this), that never goes on vacations, that gets up at 4:30 am in the summer to feed them at dawn, that has no family that 'interferes' with the birds, that can spend thousands in vet care, etc? I don't know anybody except Birdwoman and I have known and still know A LOT of people who keep birds.

People want a parrot that doesn't scream, doesn't bite, doesn't pluck, doesn't chew/destroy/poop in the house, eats commercially prepared food from a bag, talks, loves them and their entire family to pieces and does tricks! And that's why they end in terrible shape in a rescue!

Keeping pet parrots healthy and happy in captivity is an impossibility for any normal person no matter how much that person strives/spends/works for that goal.
Pajarita
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Gender: This parrot forum member is female
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Location: NE New Jersey
Number of Birds Owned: 30
Types of Birds Owned: Toos, grays, zons, canaries, finches, cardinals, senegals, jardine, redbelly, sun conure, button quail, GCC, PFC, lovebirds
Flight: Yes

Re: Finding a good home

Postby Bird woman » Sun May 28, 2017 11:51 am

THANK YOU PAJIRTA, BUT I AM BY NO MEANS EVEN CLOSE TO WHAT I WANT TO PROVIDE for THESE BEAUTIES AND ITS ALWAYS A WORK IN PROGRESS. I PROVIDE THE ABOVE MENTIONED BUT WOULD AND AM GOING TO BUILD A LARGE WINTER HEATED SPACE SO AT LEAST THEY THINK THERE OUTSIDE. THE MEDICAL , FOOD , SUNSHINE AND FLIGHT IVE GOT . IM UP AT 3:30 am and luckey enough to have a separate area to prepare food so's not to wake the flock. I have an appointment next week to have black out blinds installed in all the birds sleeping rooms as it's so hard to cover the huge cages at night. Pajirta do you think I should get the moon light bulbs for after the dark happens and I close the blinds? And yes I'm not a normal person and can really give a rats behind about anything humans think , just the crap they do to gods creatures. My bookkeeper is working on the paperwork for the 501c3 and now I'm getting excited. I don't give a dam about the money I spend , it just would further my ability to help more birds and to be able to write what I do spend off and be able to write off the hired staff. I'll be taking pictures today and maybe if pajirta has time she will post some for everyone to see, but she's busy doing the same thing . I wonder how many of us there truly are out there ? ;) BW
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Bird woman
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Gender: This parrot forum member is female
Posts: 839
Location: Southern , Oregon
Number of Birds Owned: 10
Types of Birds Owned: 2 mollucans, 2 LSC'S, 2 macaws, 1 bare-eye, 1 grey, 1 goffin and max the quaker
Flight: Yes

Re: Finding a good home

Postby Pajarita » Mon May 29, 2017 9:59 am

Patti, I've been taking in unwanted parrots since 1992 and I can guarantee you that caring for them is ALWAYS a work in progress! It's not only that we still don't know enough about them (and this covers dietary, behavioral AND medical aspects), it's also that there are so many species and they are so different from one another that, in reality, anybody who actually wanted to 'specialize' in their care should concentrate on just a few similar species because nobody can remember the huge amount of knowledge it would take to cover them all. I've always had a mind like a bear trap for facts and a prodigious memory and I struggle every single day (and double and triple check myself) so as not to miss anything (and fail, too!). I can also tell you that, of all the people I know who takes in unwanted parrots, you are the one that has the best set-up, feeds right and provides complete medical care. Rescues don't do as well, Patti, so triple kudos to you! :thumbsup:

I would not use any light whatsoever for the night. I did a little research on the specifications for moonlight and, although it's clear it needs to be a blue light because of the wavelength, the wattage would have to be way too low to actually provide a similar light. I used a radius of 5 ft and full moon (just to have an idea, I know you are not going to keep the birds in a round room :lol: ) and it gave me a result of less than 1 watt! Where are you going to find a light that low? What I would do is leave the blinds the tiniest bit open so the light from the moon and the stars shines in enough for them not to be in complete-complete darkness.

My house in Pa was smack in the middle of 5 acres covered in old forest (BIG trees) so it was super dark at night but the birds all did great there (not a single tiel had a night fright- not ever!). The other problem I see with having a light reproducing the moon light at night is that the moon goes through phases every 28 days but an artificial light would be 'stuck' in the same one all month long. Do moon phases affect birds endocrine system? I don't know and I couldn't find a single study on it (we don't even have that many on sunlight!) but, as with everything else we don't know about their physiology, I would go with natural, just in case.
Pajarita
Norwegian Blue
 
Gender: This parrot forum member is female
Posts: 11631
Location: NE New Jersey
Number of Birds Owned: 30
Types of Birds Owned: Toos, grays, zons, canaries, finches, cardinals, senegals, jardine, redbelly, sun conure, button quail, GCC, PFC, lovebirds
Flight: Yes

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