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What happens to your Parrots after you're gone

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Re: What happens to your Parrots after you're gone

Postby seagoatdeb » Mon Oct 16, 2017 3:01 pm

liz wrote:I know I am the odd one in this forum. A rescued bird remembers where he came from and how he was treated. They come to me scared and I just ignore them and let them be in the flock. I can only touch a few of them but others can touch me. They accept me as their human and a few are starting to come to me like Tommy does to get kisses. That is as long as my hands don't show.
Even so, we are bonded.


I have had rescued parrots too. I personally find that if they are fairly young they come around a lot faster but when older, and if they have had a lot of abuse they may never allow much touch.Right now the only older rescued parrot around is my daughters Senegal who is about 19. She has rehomed very well, but it took time she was afraid of every noise and would dance in fear when the shower was on, when the dishwasher was on. She was afraid of conures because the last place she had lived there were two conures that had ganged up on her. But she realizes my daughters conure keeps his distance from the pois so she is no longer afraid of the conure and she leaves him alone. She loves humans, but is afraid of any light coloured hair person or gray haired person if their hair is down. My daughter is a blond and has to put her hair up or the Sengal is afraid. We have theories of why that may be....Maybe the women who had dementia and had to be put in nursing home had bad days and left her hair down and when she had a good day she put her hair up? But the Senegal was well socialized at some point and kept it, so she loves my daughter and will ride on her husbands shoulder too, and she likes me, but she has a hate on for my daughters Meyers. Someone at some point had taught her to dance. if you sing to her she dances to it and she loves to be sung too.

Glad you got the problem fixed and are back Liz.
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seagoatdeb
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Re: What happens to your Parrots after you're gone

Postby seagoatdeb » Mon Oct 16, 2017 3:08 pm

Pajarita wrote:HEY! You made it! Glad the log-in problem was solved!

But the birds you are referring to are aviary, most likely, not hand-fed [very, VERY few tiels are!] and came to you as adults, Liz. The other posters are talking about hand-fed versus parent-raised companion babies.


Yes there is a difference. if they were hand fed or even if they were parent raise but handled at a very young age by humans, they have learned that humans at least some of them can be trusted. That makes it a lot easier to win their trust.
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seagoatdeb
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Re: What happens to your Parrots after you're gone

Postby Pajarita » Tue Oct 17, 2017 11:25 am

In my personal experience, even adult, parent-raised cockatiels come around without the human having to do anything but wait. They are the sweetest, sweetest things!

As to adopted/rehomed/rescued parrots... I think whether they come around or not doesn't have to do so much with age but what kind of treatment they got in their previous home[s]. But, even the 'hard to crack nuts' come around given enough time - at least, that has been my experience.
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Re: What happens to your Parrots after you're gone

Postby seagoatdeb » Wed Oct 18, 2017 3:00 am

Pajarita wrote:In my personal experience, even adult, parent-raised cockatiels come around without the human having to do anything but wait. They are the sweetest, sweetest things!

As to adopted/rehomed/rescued parrots... I think whether they come around or not doesn't have to do so much with age but what kind of treatment they got in their previous home[s]. But, even the 'hard to crack nuts' come around given enough time - at least, that has been my experience.


Cockatiels are the most loving things. My wild one Cezanne, the beautiful Latino who liked every human being was wild cockatiel, but she was a baby and she tamed so fast it was amazing. She really was the sweetest thing ever and trusted every human and would go on anyone. She never talked, but most females dont. Gaugan got along with her great too, until Gaugan hit 4 years old and then she just couldnt take the way Cezanne couldnt understand her boundaries. All the other parrots understood the boundaries, But Cezanne who couldnt ever stay upset about anything for longer than 5 minutes just couldnt understand how Red Bellys can get mad and hold grudges. So I had to never let them out at the same time after Gaugan turned 4. Cezanne was the only parrot Gaugan didnt stay able to form a relationship of some kind with. i became alergic to the powder dander of the cockatiels so none for me anymore, but that just as well since pois are a little much for cockatiels often.
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Re: What happens to your Parrots after you're gone

Postby liz » Wed Oct 18, 2017 7:06 am

From what I have seen in videos even wild parrots will tame themselves when humans are nice to them. I just love it that humans supplement the wild birds food supply.
I killed a lot of hanging plants on the porch and hung up bird houses instead. They were full every summer and the birds got used to me being there and peeking into the nests. I put out seed from November to the first of May to make it easier for them. Some birds spent the winter in the nests.

When I moved to NC I had a flowering plant on my balcony. .Brds came to it so I put up feeders too. There were about 20 that came to the feeders. We were having a lot of rain and I worried that they could not survive those big raindrops. They did and rather than fly out after feeding they just perched in my plant. When we decided to move I worried for the birds. They were used to feeding on the deck and I was afraid they would not find enough food. There was a neighbor across the parking lot with plants on their balcony. I did not know them but went to ask if they would take care of my humming birds. I gave them the hanging plant and feeders with directions of how to make their food. I kept one feeder until they all moved over to the other balcony. These little ones were so social that they stayed on the balcony even when I went out on it.
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Re: What happens to your Parrots after you're gone

Postby Pajarita » Wed Oct 18, 2017 11:57 am

Yes, wild birds are pretty smart when it comes to where they find food! When I was away at Orlando and my husband was in charge of my 'animal chores', he said there were only two or three pigeons coming to eat but I knew it was because he did not follow my schedule and, the first morning after, I went outside, at the same time I always do, and there was my flock of pigeons waiting for their breakfast, same as always. I showed it to him with a "'SEE?!" because I had replied to his comment that it was because he was not following my schedule and he had denied it -which I KNEW it was a lie!

The funniest thing was that there were lots of birds in Disney and Universal, including a number of pigeons, looking for food so my grandson and I always carried some extra toasts from our hotel breakfast to feed them and my grandson was trying to get them to come down from where they were perching by making the same sound I make to call my pigeons at home - which, of course, did not work! :lol:
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Re: What happens to your Parrots after you're gone

Postby seagoatdeb » Wed Oct 18, 2017 3:17 pm

About two years ago i was sitting in my back yard under the shade of a tree and all of a sudden there was a Magpie land on my lap. There was squawking from the tree and i realized pretty fast this Magpie was a baby and the parents were distressed. I blinked at the parents and sat there quietly for at least 10 minutes before the baby Magpie left. They all went over the fence after that. But those Magpies were never very afraid of me after that. i also had a family of quails go across my yard and the neighbours cat came over. i chased the cat away and the quails were not scared of me after that. I think all birds of are smart and figure out who they can trust.
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Re: What happens to your Parrots after you're gone

Postby Pajarita » Mon Oct 23, 2017 1:06 pm

I agree completely! Even the little sparrows are very smart! My aunt had raised one that had fallen from its nest and named him Pio Pio [which is the Spanish equivalent of the English onomatopoeic 'peep' that baby birds make] - this bird flew free all over the house but came to perch on my aunt's shoulder or head whenever she called him - and without any kind of training, mind you!
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Norwegian Blue
 
Gender: This parrot forum member is female
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Number of Birds Owned: 30
Types of Birds Owned: Toos, grays, zons, canaries, finches, cardinals, senegals, jardine, redbelly, sun conure, button quail, GCC, PFC, lovebirds
Flight: Yes

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