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Healthy Senegal help

Talk about bird illnesses and other bird health related issues. Seeds, pellets, fruits, vegetables and more. Discuss what to feed your birds and in what quantity. Share your recipe ideas.

Healthy Senegal help

Postby Katie80 » Sun Aug 19, 2018 7:17 am

What is a healthy weight for a Senegal please?
She is small, although only realised this recently after seeing another sennie. I’ve weighed her and scales show her at 100g. She has been poorly, where she had pale skin around her eyes week and plucked her feathers out and working really hard since she came home in June, to improve her health with fresh fruit and veggies, handling (poor social skills) and good quality food, but would really like advice on how to continue to improve her health further.

She also has a gorgeous new cage and so many toys, but she doesn’t really seem to remember how to play...
Katie80
Parakeet
 
Gender: This parrot forum member is female
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Types of Birds Owned: Senegal
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Re: Healthy Senegal help

Postby Michael » Sun Aug 19, 2018 8:27 am

It varies just like with people. Females tend to be smaller but it’s a range. 105-180g is what I’ve seen.
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Michael
Macaw
 
Gender: This parrot forum member is male
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Types of Birds Owned: Senegal Parrot, Cape Parrot, Green-Winged Macaw
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Re: Healthy Senegal help

Postby Katie80 » Sun Aug 19, 2018 9:18 am

Thank you for your reply
Katie80
Parakeet
 
Gender: This parrot forum member is female
Posts: 5
Number of Birds Owned: 1
Types of Birds Owned: Senegal
Flight: Yes

Re: Healthy Senegal help

Postby Pajarita » Sun Aug 19, 2018 9:57 am

I never really worry over a bird that is a bit underweight if all the blood work came back good. I worry more about birds that are too fat because that usually means the beginning of liver issues. As to a good diet, I've done research on parrots natural diets for over 20 years [since my first rescue was diagnosed with high uric acid] and have long ago reached the conclusion that pellets are not and never will be the best dietary option for them. I can elaborate in detail and give you links, if you wish, but, basically, it's because they are way too dry [max 10% when their natural diet is never under 85% moisture], ingredients are animal feed grade [my birds eat human grade], soy [none of my animals eat anything with soy, too risky!], it's 'dead' food [no phytonutrients whatsoever], man-made vitamins [which we know are not used by the body as effectively as food-derived ones] and, to put the icing on the cake, you never know how much protein you are actually feeding!. My birds eat gloop accompanied with raw produce for breakfast and all day picking and a mix of nuts and seeds I prepare myself for dinner. They also get vitamins twice a week but mainly for the D3 because they get everything else from their food.

Sennies, in my personal experience, are pretty good eaters -at least, all the ones I've had were. Mine love their gloop and fruits/veggies -not a whole lot of luck with leafy greens but they do love raw broccoli and anything that has a crunchy stalk [like the very heart of romaines, Swiss chard, bok choy, etc]. There are things I never feed - like spinach, collard greens, beet greens, parsley... you know, stuff with too much oxalic acid And there are things that I don't feed often, like kale that is super high in sorbitol,
Pajarita
Norwegian Blue
 
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