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Preemptive Cage Planning

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Preemptive Cage Planning

Postby Laronce » Wed Mar 28, 2018 1:17 pm

As my aunt gifted me a cage her Senegal doesn't like for when I get a bird of my own this June, I've been able to set it up and get a feel for how things could go.

The cage is currently in the living room. Which is far enough way from the kitchen and any fumes from cookery. This room is upstairs with plenty of light, and is the most used room. So the bird wouldn't get lonely, as there's almost always someone around.

There is a door that would be a straight flight from the cage, but in all the years we had a budgie, we were very careful about her being inside before using it, and she never once got outside.

The only foreseeable problem is that the cage would need to be moved in the evening to my parents room, as lights, TV and other things would bother the bird. Their room would be quiet and dark at a more appropriate time for a solar schedule. The cage is on wheels, so moving it nightly wouldn't be an issue.

Does this sound like an okay set up for a parrot? Not too stressful?
Laronce
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Re: Preemptive Cage Planning

Postby Navre » Thu Mar 29, 2018 8:22 am

It sounds pretty good! Another option is a sleeping cage in the quiet room.
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Re: Preemptive Cage Planning

Postby Pajarita » Thu Mar 29, 2018 9:56 am

The set-up sounds right but whether the potential stress from a busy room is acceptable or not depends on the species because, for example, while a gray would get all stressed out with hullabaloo, a cockatoo would love it but might get too excited [never good with a too] from it.

John [Navre] is correct as to the sleeping cage - might be easier to get a smaller cage for sleeping than moving the whole thing back and forth.
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Re: Preemptive Cage Planning

Postby Laronce » Thu Mar 29, 2018 11:08 am

Thank you for the replies!

So a smaller sleeping cage wouldn't be too much stress? Their cage is their home, moving them between the two twice a day wouldn't freak them out too much?
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Re: Preemptive Cage Planning

Postby liz » Fri Mar 30, 2018 4:39 am

Rainbow will always choose a little cage for "nite nite". If there is one in the room he will move to it then tell me "nite nite" then go back to the big cage to hang out during the day.

None of my birds are normal. Rainbow loves excitement and has passed that on to Myrtle. The more going on around Rainbow is the more talking she does.
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Re: Preemptive Cage Planning

Postby Pajarita » Fri Mar 30, 2018 10:00 am

Laronce wrote:Thank you for the replies!

So a smaller sleeping cage wouldn't be too much stress? Their cage is their home, moving them between the two twice a day wouldn't freak them out too much?



A cage is NEVER a home to a bird. This is something that is often repeated in birdsites but it's one of those euphemisms we, parrot keepers, use just to make ourselves feel better about the fact that we are keeping an animal that evolved to live with the endless sky as their home in a jail cell for hours and hours every day. A parrot can learn not to hate its cage and accept going into it without a problem but only the ones that have had their spirit broken or have been abused find any kind of comfort in it. So, no, moving the bird to a smaller sleeping cage will not be stressful to the bird as long as it's done at the right time [because you have to wait until the bird is very drowsy and wants to go to sleep] - and by that I mean about one hour after you feed it dinner which should coincide with it being about two hours after you turned off the overhead lights in the room where his 'day' cage is located [they need the different light that happens during dawn and dusk to set their internal clock]. This time of the year, for example, you would turn off the overhead lights at 4:30 pm, feed dinner at around 5:30 pm and move it to his sleeping cage at around 6:30 to 7 pm [and he will be asleep by 7:30 or so].
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Re: Preemptive Cage Planning

Postby Laronce » Fri Mar 30, 2018 12:39 pm

Pajarita wrote:A cage is NEVER a home to a bird. This is something that is often repeated in birdsites but it's one of those euphemisms we, parrot keepers, use just to make ourselves feel better about the fact that we are keeping an animal that evolved to live with the endless sky as their home in a jail cell for hours and hours every day. A parrot can learn not to hate its cage and accept going into it without a problem but only the ones that have had their spirit broken or have been abused find any kind of comfort in it. So, no, moving the bird to a smaller sleeping cage will not be stressful to the bird as long as it's done at the right time [because you have to wait until the bird is very drowsy and wants to go to sleep] - and by that I mean about one hour after you feed it dinner which should coincide with it being about two hours after you turned off the overhead lights in the room where his 'day' cage is located [they need the different light that happens during dawn and dusk to set their internal clock]. This time of the year, for example, you would turn off the overhead lights at 4:30 pm, feed dinner at around 5:30 pm and move it to his sleeping cage at around 6:30 to 7 pm [and he will be asleep by 7:30 or so].


Geesh, it makes it hard to do proper research when not many sites know what's really best for a bird. Thank you for the insight and the solar schedule tips, I'm making sure to keep notes.
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Re: Preemptive Cage Planning

Postby Pajarita » Sat Mar 31, 2018 10:24 am

Yes, research on proper bird husbandry is very hard to do when one relies on birdsites, the pet industry and bird owners opinions because, usually, they will tell you that something is good for the bird when, in reality, the reason is that it's convenient or profitable to them. The other frame of mind that you need to question is when things 'make sense'. Because with this is that, to us [mammals used to keeping domesticated hierarchical mammal species], the things that seem logical are not necessarily right when it comes to birds which are COMPLETELY different from mammals. I'll give you one example: discipline. It works great with animals that belong to hierarchical social groups but it doesn't work at all with parrots because they don't even understand the concept of obedience. BUT there is a sure way to figure out what is the right information: GO TO NATURE! Nature took millennia to fine-tune, through evolution, the species you would be caring for so that it would thrive in its natural habitat - ergo, if you emulate, as best as possible, the conditions the wild birds live under, you are sure to do most of it right. And I say 'most of it' because, let's face it, none of us can give our pet birds as good a life as it would have in the wild - all we can aspire to is to keep them healthy and semi-content.
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