Trained Parrot BlogParrot Wizard Online Parrot Toy StoreThe Parrot Forum

Delete please

Talk about bird illnesses and other bird health related issues. Seeds, pellets, fruits, vegetables and more. Discuss what to feed your birds and in what quantity. Share your recipe ideas.

Delete please

Postby Roxi » Wed Oct 09, 2019 12:29 am

Please delete ty!
Last edited by Roxi on Wed Oct 09, 2019 12:24 pm, edited 2 times in total.
Roxi
Parakeet
 
Gender: This parrot forum member is female
Posts: 3
Number of Birds Owned: 0
Types of Birds Owned: African Grey
Flight: Yes

Xx

Postby Roxi » Wed Oct 09, 2019 1:36 am

Please delete
Last edited by Roxi on Wed Oct 09, 2019 12:51 pm, edited 2 times in total.
Roxi
Parakeet
 
Gender: This parrot forum member is female
Posts: 3
Number of Birds Owned: 0
Types of Birds Owned: African Grey
Flight: Yes

Re: Bumble foot

Postby Pajarita » Wed Oct 09, 2019 9:57 am

Welcome to the forum and thank you so much for taking in poor Nemo!

Now, I seriously doubt he has bumble foot because he has a bad leg. I've had birds with only one leg or one foot and they did not developed bumble foot from always using the same one. It's not the weight that causes bumble foot, it's the perch itself that does it. And it's not the 'smoothness' of the perches that cause it, it's the fact that they all have the same diameter which makes the bird's foot end up with the pressure always on the same spots. Perches need to be of different diameters (from wide to very narrow) and they should never be completely straight and parallel to the floor. Think of tree branches... there are big ones, there are medium ones and there are little ones... they are straight and they are crooked and they are hardly ever perfectly parallel to the ground. The sheer 'uneveness' is what prevents bumble foot because as they go from one branch to another, their feet end up curling in different ways and the pressure points vary from one perch to another. See what I mean?

First thing you need to do is to get yourself branches of different diameters AND a couple of platforms (because opening up the foot to stand on a completely horizontal surface will relieve pressure on the points it uses when it curls around a rouch perch -as in a branch). You can also use one slat (a flat perch) - that will provide even more perching 'variety'.

As to what to use for 'wrapping' material, I use the quilted paper towels. Wrapped a few times around a perch provides a soft and almost 'fluffy' surface for the ulcerated sole and they are easy to change and keep clean. Use either cardboard wrapped in paper towel for the platform (I used to use the old fashioned wooden clothes pins -the ones without the metal thingie) to hold the covering to the platform).

For medicine, I never use ointments on animals - they don't work because they don't last, especially on the sole of a foot! I like sulfa powder. It's an old-fashioned bactericide which dries up an open wound and creates a nice scab to protect it AND the animal can lick it without any danger.

Diet: well, in my personal opinion, grays are the pickiest eaters of all the parrot world BUT persistence, presentation and timing always ends up winning the day. None of my birds likes chop - and I don't blame them. For one thing, it's completely unnatural (birds do not eat 'salads' made out of different ingredients in the wild) and, for another, it's not as nutritious as people think it is because it's made with fresh produce which has already lost a lot of its nutrition by the time it gets to your fridge. I feed gloop with raw produce for breakfast and all day picking and a seed mix, seed/nut or nuts for dinner, depending on the species (my gray eats a tablespoon of a cockatiel seed mix with a two or three different kinds of nuts in it -like 1/4 walnut, 1 almond and 1 pistachio, for example). I also supplement them twice or three times a week with a multivitamin/mineral in their water. The thing is that if you free-feed any type of protein food, you will never get a gray to eat a good diet. You might get an amazon or a quaker to eat some produce this way but never a gray. Try a grain-only gloop and, when you see he is eating it, start adding frozen veggies to it one by one (start with sweet corn, then peas, then carrots, etc) and always eat raw produce with him early in the morning (parrots learn what is good to eat from other parrots but in the absence of another one, it falls to us to provide them with the example).

I hope that what I am going to say does not offend you but the video of Nemo in the park shows a stressed out bird, on high alert for predators. He is NOT a happy camper, my dear. I know that you did it because you thought it was the best thing for him but it's not. Parrots are not adventurous animals... they are born, live and die in the same known and familiar relatively small territory and are always surrounded by their family. Having a single bird in a human home is bad enough for them without taking it out to a completely unfamiliar place, with weird noises and smells and no flock around them to make them feel safe. Stressed out parrots do not heal well so, please, eliminate all sources of stress and that includes trips to the park (pet parrots don't know that a park is the closest there is to their natural habitat - they've never lived in one) . Also, make sure he is following a strict solar schedule and that his daily routine follows what would be a natural circadian cycle in the wild.
Pajarita
Norwegian Blue
 
Gender: This parrot forum member is female
Posts: 15256
Location: NE New Jersey
Number of Birds Owned: 30
Types of Birds Owned: Toos, grays, zons, canaries, finches, cardinals, senegals, jardine, redbelly, sun conure, button quail, GCC, PFC, lovebirds
Flight: Yes

Pajarita

Postby Roxi » Wed Oct 09, 2019 12:50 pm

I need to clarify a few of your concerns.

1: All perches are uneven and natural. And it was one of the forums moderators on another post that stated that the cause of bumblefoot can be caused by the smoothness of a perch as well.

2: Taking Nemo to the park is his way of getting sunlight which is imperative. We live in a condo. He was upset in the video because his bonded human went running to go pick flowers for him and was out of sight. Most times he is relaxed and pruning himself while watching his bonded child play with other kids.

3: His deformity is with his foot "scuffling/dragging" across surfaces which can lead to rawness due to friction, which was explained by the parrot organization, which is a legit institution. The organizers have 40 years of experience with Greys and parrots and did an in-home inspection of his cage and through my entire house to make sure he will be accommodated before I was allowed to sign documents to claim him. They stated themselves the branches and perches were perfect. We dont even have twine or rope toys in his cage due to the dangers of impaction.

4: His deformity does cause rawness to his feet because of the way he walks, which was proven by top Californian aviary vets provided by the parrot sanctuary. His deformity is not the same as having one foot.

4: Ointment is the only way I can treat his feet, because he is not very tamed yet, socialized? Yes, but has a fear of hands. So idk how one would go about putting powder on his foot without him holding a grudge because were still trying to bond.

5: Fleece is softer than paper towels and it is much softer than paper towels especially with his one foot-dragging when he walks and climbs.

I am actually pretty irritated here. Because although some of it was sound advice such as the food ( which I am doing already), however, most of the advice given was plugged in by jumping to conclusions. I checked his feet this morning and they look amazing again and scabbed over.
Thank you for your time.
Roxi
Parakeet
 
Gender: This parrot forum member is female
Posts: 3
Number of Birds Owned: 0
Types of Birds Owned: African Grey
Flight: Yes

Re: Delete please

Postby Pajarita » Wed Oct 09, 2019 2:10 pm

I am sorry you are irritated by my reply, I was just trying to help your bird. I have learned never to be irritated over replies to my postings... but that's me. I have a very thick skin and my priority is always to learn - which I personally understand it to involve debate, misunderstandings followed by clarification and a large amount of eating humble pie. Of course, I have been doing this for many years so I guess that makes a difference. I have also learned that not all avian vets are very knowledgeable about parrots... as a matter of fact, they all know very little (not their fault, nobody does). I still don't see how dragging a foot would create ulcers on the sole - unless they are not on the sole. The pictures did not show any ulcers on the top of the feet and, as far as I know, bumble foot is always on the sole of the feet but I don't see how a foot that cannot be used normally (I assume it cannot clench the perch) can get it on the sole. I actually thought the sores were on the 'good' foot. But I can see how constant friction on one side of a foot can cause first irritation and then an ulcer (which I now guess it's what you were referring to) only, if that is the case, I would not treat it by covering perches, I would simply bandage or, better still, put a shoe on the useless foot that is being dragged around, instead. And, in all honesty, if the foot is completely useless and is just being dragged around and getting constantly hurt in the process, the rescue should have considered amputation. I mean, why have the poor bird suffering chronic pain and risking sepsis for no good reason? The foot does not work and they do just as well with one foot as with two. Of course, if it does have a level of functionality, it should not be amputated and the environment just needs to be adjusted for it - which I am assuming it's the case here although the chronic ulcers are a big concern.

Actually, sunlight is not imperative... it's not even necessary.

I suggested paper towels because they end up being cleaner than any material (you throw them away when they are dirty) and never cause crop impaction -which fleece can do.

And, although I am risking further irritation on your part because you might interpret this as antagonizing you, it seems to me that if you can spread ointment on the foot, you can sprinkle a powder even easier (you wouldn't even have to touch it which you need to do with the ointment).

I also doubt that any rescue organization has 40 years of experience because I do not think there are any rescues that are that old. I mean, that would put the founding of the rescue back in 1979 and, back then, parrots were VERY rare and SUPER expensive and the birds all died young so there was no need for rescues. I mean, Mikaboo and Foster Parrots are only 20 years old, The Oasis and The Gabriel Foundation are just a couple of years older and those are the oldest bird rescues in USA - Phoenix Landing and the myriad little ones that we have nowadays are actually pretty new. I took in my first rescue back in 1992 and there were hardly any rescues even then... Not that the actual age of the rescue is of any relevance in my opinion... I just though I would mention this because you seem to believe that the improbable 40 years of age of the rescue was a recommendation in itself.
Pajarita
Norwegian Blue
 
Gender: This parrot forum member is female
Posts: 15256
Location: NE New Jersey
Number of Birds Owned: 30
Types of Birds Owned: Toos, grays, zons, canaries, finches, cardinals, senegals, jardine, redbelly, sun conure, button quail, GCC, PFC, lovebirds
Flight: Yes

Re: Delete please

Postby Pajarita » Thu Oct 10, 2019 12:00 pm

I just want to make one clarification to this thread because I don't want people getting confused about the term (especially since the OP mentions a moderator previously giving the smoothness of dowels as a possible cause for it). This bird does not have bumblefoot although it might have or have had an infection caused by the same pathogens that cause infection in bumblefoot - which doesn't really signify as any open wound can end up with an infection caused by the same pathogens. Bumblefoot in birds, with the exception of birds of prey, it is ALWAYS understood to be on the bottom of the feet and is always caused by bad husbandry. What this bird has (and I am assuming here as no picture was given and the explanation only used the term bumblefoot but did not explain where the sores were or what they looked like) is ulcers caused by the friction of dragging its bad foot on (again, I am assuming) rough surfaces. Bumblefoot is easily taken care of with good husbandry. What this bird has cannot be cured the same way because it was not husbandry that created it but a physical impediment.
Pajarita
Norwegian Blue
 
Gender: This parrot forum member is female
Posts: 15256
Location: NE New Jersey
Number of Birds Owned: 30
Types of Birds Owned: Toos, grays, zons, canaries, finches, cardinals, senegals, jardine, redbelly, sun conure, button quail, GCC, PFC, lovebirds
Flight: Yes


Return to Health, Nutrition & Diet

Who is online

Users browsing this forum: Google [Bot] and 16 guests

Parrot ForumArticles IndexTraining Step UpParrot Training BlogPoicephalus Parrot InformationParrot Wizard Store